Top Ten Tweets for Tuesday

twitter.fw
Here is a selection of our favourite tweets and retweets from the TEL_St_A Twitter feed this week – just in case you missed them!

 Tweet  Tweeted by
“Confessions of an academic on Twitter” – great summary and resources too: bit.ly/1Jj9T2R  #socialmedia #edtech @Researcher_Kate
Facebook, email and TV are dying out as #hashtag becomes children’s word of the year t.co/sNjJMIlacy @Jisc
Academic writing and wikipedia – t.co/Jm3mOxzFeq @sharonflynn
How flipped learning works in (and out of) the classroom | @scoopit via @NikPeachey t.co/sLb98Y6qzy @OzMark17
What’s an open badge really worth? flic.kr/p/sbUcTH
#openbadges #edtech
@tel_st_a
Why technology will never fix education: bit.ly/1FuZT3Q #edtech @hannahwhaley
Average academic article read by about 10 people – start publishing on social media? bit.ly/1IVVTJT @notanna1
Summer of V’s: Visualising movement by Urska Demsar – t.co/Z0YInue5aH @StAndrewsIDIR
 “Student Engagment” – buzzword or fuzzword? bit.ly/1ct8f1
#edtech
@tel_st_a
Report on the possible futures for digital credentials & #openbadges t.co/zmLHIQPNpy #edtech @Benjaroome

 

Top Ten Tweets for Thursday

twitter.fw
Here is a selection of our favourite tweets and retweets from the TEL_St_A Twitter feed this week – just in case you missed them!

 Tweet  Tweeted by
My post on sentiment analysis and the UK General Election bit.ly/1dNroMW #GE15 @mia_out
“The role of students in pedagogical research projects: Subjects, participants, partners, consultants?” @YSJADD bit.ly/1AE4Wuy @philvincent
Free course content anyone can download and import into their own #Moodle courses
t.co/mExOeb68UE via @moodlenet #edtech #OER
@moodle
When professors tweet. US context – conflict between academic freedom, “civility” and provocation.
bit.ly/1IdkEEQ via @AcademeBlog
@tel_st_a
Challenges and pressures of reading online, and some strategies (using @Pocket) to manage these:
bit.ly/1EQiO8V #edtech
@tel_st_a
Inspirational (?) quotes for our students writing their #thesis @PhDForum @GradElitism
t.co/mSxgorO1vo
@StAndrewsBSRC
Great post in response to RIN’s assertion that technology is killing map-reading skills.
bit.ly/1PoT3PO
@cbthomson
Let’s ban PowerPoint in lectures – it makes students more stupid and professors more boring’
t.co/PkW4HGaMn6 (via @bent_meier)
@jisc
@StADoRep PP is just a tool, but not originally designed for teaching and can be used well or badly.
A goodworkman doesn’t blame his tools!
@tel_st_a
Good response to this http://bit.ly/1DPhDnH by @samkinsley bit.ly/1zMKpcw @tel_st_a
Five Fables app, based on research by our own Ian Johnson and Chris Jones has won best app at @CelticMediaFest! More: t.co/ObAZblaUtY @staenglish

 

Workshop > Data Visualization in the Humanities

events.fwThe Library, as part of its Digital Humanities remit, hosted a workshop on Data Visualization in the Humanities led by external presenter Mia Ridge.

Mia began by outlining the historical development of visualization – starting with examples such as John Snow’s Cholera Map (1854), Florence Nightingale’s Petal Charts (1858) and Minard’s map of Napoleon’s Russian campaign of 1812 (1869); and highlighting the power of the visualization in enabling the viewer to understand data easily on multiple axes at the same time. She then moved on to show more recent types of visualization – mashups, infographics, text analysis, visualizing images and video and network visualizations.

Visualization needs to be approached carefully, with proper consideration given to audience and purpose. For example, will your visualization be a product, or a process – will it be used to explain, or explore your dataset?

Some risks of visualizations were highlighted to help contextualize their use:

  • Over-emphasis of one aspect of the data may de-emphasise another, for example, Beck’s tube map of 1951 emphasises connections but de-emphasises geographical proximity.
  • Some visualization tools and softwares may have inherent bias built into them depending on what audience they were designed for. The algorithms used may not be transparent, for example with Google’s N-gram tool.
  • Visualizing “sentiment” analysis is not an exact science. Current algorithms can work with words, but take no account of tone or register (or even emojis!).  For an example of “sentiment” analysis, see the Twitter visualization of the Olympics in 2012.

As well as the time to get hands-on with and evaluate various visualization tools, it was great to see and hear about the work already being done in this area by colleagues around the University, for example Kathryn Rudy from the School of Art History – and of course the exciting digital humanities projects taking place in the Library.

For more information on digital humanities at St Andrews, contact Dr Alice Crawford in the Library – or catch up with her blog.