Around Campus: Translating French Opera

music.fwAt the last Learning & Teaching Committee, we heard about an innovative Honours module that has been running in the School of Modern Languages this year – with Dr Julia Prest as module leader and collaborating with staff in the Music Department. Translating French Opera involves students in translating an eighteenth century libretto by Guillard (not translated in the last 50 years) from French into modern English – their efforts culminating in a performance of the translated opera (Iphigénie en Tauride by Gluck) by St Andrews Opera on 15, 17 & 18 June 2015. The project (in the context of the module) had a collective core but allowed plenty of scope for individual choice. The student versions of the libretto formed the basis for Julia’s own final version, which is what will be sung in June – with some of the students on the module performing, and Julia herself in the chorus.IMG_1705
The opera in rehearsal

 

 

Around Campus: Video Enhanced Reflective Feedback (VERP)

video.fwThe departments of Music, Social Anthropology and the School of Management (as a result of a successful Teaching Development Fund application) are working jointly on a project to build student confidence through video-enhanced reflective feedback. The methodology involves videoing a group performance (Music); role-play exercise (Social Anthropology) or group presentation (Management). The resulting video is then edited by the tutor into small fragments which highlight strong points. These smaller clips are then used as part of tutor-mediated feedback between the tutor and the student(s) concerned. A workshop in August with an external consultant will give staff the appropriate grounding in the VERP methodology; and a relatively small amount of technical training will be required.

For further information on the project, please contact Dr Jane Pettegree, and look out for her blog post reflecting on the first run of VERP in November!

 

Top Ten Tweets for Tuesday

twitter.fw
Here is a selection of our favourite tweets and retweets from the TEL_St_A Twitter feed this week – just in case you missed them!

 Tweet  Tweeted by
“My teaching is in the comments” – bit.ly/1Hm1N7E good points on systems, content v dialogue bit.ly/1L4U9ip #edtech @tel_st_a
Yes! Here’s nearly 50 examples collated by@Jisc of effective practice in support of the
#digitalstudentexperience t.co/pDF7aKMNIy
@sallyheroes
It’s every digital citizen’s job to THINK. t.co/dDyo7plrjo @edutopia
Digital students are different – really? Is what “I want” and “I expect” the same as “what I really need”? #edtech http://bit.ly/1FqKumm @tel_st_a
@rbancroft: Berkeley to Stop Adding Lecture Videos to YouTube, Citing Budget Cuts t.co/e5Z4ja4GPI via@chronicle @sheilmcn
More “problems” with #YikYak? First death threats wapo.st/1cr36Im, now cheating on exams: bit.ly/1EXnMSD #edtech #socialmedia @tel_st_a
Can Google search data predict an election victory? The story behind the story: t.co/ICWWvFmUed (spoiler: no) @undertheraedar
The Next Generation Digital Learning Environment goes beyond the #LMS to support new models of learning: t.co/v0r65qPpv0 @educause
 Is the ‘closed’ mindset of the Open Educational Resources community its own worst enemy? t.co/E3uI25MlXi @DonaldClark
Can police learn from #bigdata t.co/TotmJeajb3 “if it’s at the low end, 50 percent to 70 percent, then let’s not divert people to it” @dazybelle

 

Top Ten Tweets for Thursday

twitter.fw
Here is a selection of our favourite tweets and retweets from the TEL_St_A Twitter feed this week – just in case you missed them!

 Tweet  Tweeted by
My post on sentiment analysis and the UK General Election bit.ly/1dNroMW #GE15 @mia_out
“The role of students in pedagogical research projects: Subjects, participants, partners, consultants?” @YSJADD bit.ly/1AE4Wuy @philvincent
Free course content anyone can download and import into their own #Moodle courses
t.co/mExOeb68UE via @moodlenet #edtech #OER
@moodle
When professors tweet. US context – conflict between academic freedom, “civility” and provocation.
bit.ly/1IdkEEQ via @AcademeBlog
@tel_st_a
Challenges and pressures of reading online, and some strategies (using @Pocket) to manage these:
bit.ly/1EQiO8V #edtech
@tel_st_a
Inspirational (?) quotes for our students writing their #thesis @PhDForum @GradElitism
t.co/mSxgorO1vo
@StAndrewsBSRC
Great post in response to RIN’s assertion that technology is killing map-reading skills.
bit.ly/1PoT3PO
@cbthomson
Let’s ban PowerPoint in lectures – it makes students more stupid and professors more boring’
t.co/PkW4HGaMn6 (via @bent_meier)
@jisc
@StADoRep PP is just a tool, but not originally designed for teaching and can be used well or badly.
A goodworkman doesn’t blame his tools!
@tel_st_a
Good response to this http://bit.ly/1DPhDnH by @samkinsley bit.ly/1zMKpcw @tel_st_a
Five Fables app, based on research by our own Ian Johnson and Chris Jones has won best app at @CelticMediaFest! More: t.co/ObAZblaUtY @staenglish

 

Workshop > Data Visualization in the Humanities

events.fwThe Library, as part of its Digital Humanities remit, hosted a workshop on Data Visualization in the Humanities led by external presenter Mia Ridge.

Mia began by outlining the historical development of visualization – starting with examples such as John Snow’s Cholera Map (1854), Florence Nightingale’s Petal Charts (1858) and Minard’s map of Napoleon’s Russian campaign of 1812 (1869); and highlighting the power of the visualization in enabling the viewer to understand data easily on multiple axes at the same time. She then moved on to show more recent types of visualization – mashups, infographics, text analysis, visualizing images and video and network visualizations.

Visualization needs to be approached carefully, with proper consideration given to audience and purpose. For example, will your visualization be a product, or a process – will it be used to explain, or explore your dataset?

Some risks of visualizations were highlighted to help contextualize their use:

  • Over-emphasis of one aspect of the data may de-emphasise another, for example, Beck’s tube map of 1951 emphasises connections but de-emphasises geographical proximity.
  • Some visualization tools and softwares may have inherent bias built into them depending on what audience they were designed for. The algorithms used may not be transparent, for example with Google’s N-gram tool.
  • Visualizing “sentiment” analysis is not an exact science. Current algorithms can work with words, but take no account of tone or register (or even emojis!).  For an example of “sentiment” analysis, see the Twitter visualization of the Olympics in 2012.

As well as the time to get hands-on with and evaluate various visualization tools, it was great to see and hear about the work already being done in this area by colleagues around the University, for example Kathryn Rudy from the School of Art History – and of course the exciting digital humanities projects taking place in the Library.

For more information on digital humanities at St Andrews, contact Dr Alice Crawford in the Library – or catch up with her blog.